White Paper Overview: The Wind of Change: When and how to implement your FSM system – a guide to change management best practices

Dec 15 • Features, Research, White Papers & eBooks • 1943 Views • No Comments on White Paper Overview: The Wind of Change: When and how to implement your FSM system – a guide to change management best practices

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Resource Type: White Paper
Published by:  Field Service News (commissioned by Tesseract)
Title: The Wind of Change: When and How to Implement your FSM System – A Guide to Change Management Best Practices

Want to know more? Access to this resource is available to Field Service News subscribers only – but if you are a Field Service Professional you may qualify for a complimentary industry practitioner subscription!

Field Service Professional? Click here to apply for a complimentary industry subscription to Field Service News and get the resource “Your Guide to Flawless Field Service – Perfecting Productivity” sent directly to your inbox now

Synopsis:

A Wind of Change - When and How to Implement an FSM System .pdf-1Within the last decade we have seen field service shift from being a necessary evil, to a core differentiator and even in some instances, to ultimately becoming the primary revenue stream.

Whilst this shift may not be as dramatic for all companies, you can be sure that almost every company with a field service operation – including you and your peers, will be at least some way along this path. What is also certain is that as you make your way along this path, at some point you will need to take a look at your current field service processes and the technology you are using to support them. Indeed, technology continues to play an increasingly important role in field service.

Your existing field service management (FSM) solution is likely to be well embedded within your workflow already – but as tools like the Internet of Things and Augmented Reality drive concepts such as ‘connected field service’ from futuristic vision to genuine process, an upgrade of your FSM system is going to be unavoidable. The problem is that a FSM solution is of course mission critical and therefore any disruption caused when changing such an important system must be managed and minimised.

With this in mind this white paper explores how to identify key signs that it is time to upgrade your FSM system as well as examining some best-practice thinking on implementation and change management methodologies.

Overview: 

The key topics discussed in this white paper include:

Knowing when to upgrade your FSM system:

Whilst knowing when it’s time to replace your FSM system is based on multiple factors unique to each organisation, there are a number of strong indicators you can monitor to help you make that call at the right time.

A selection of these include…

  • Your Own Efficiency
  • How does your tech investment compare to industry trends?
  • Know your enemy
  • Listen to your end-users
  • Listen To Your Customers
  • Regular reporting nightmares

Change Management Best Practice:

Let’s make no bones about it, a FSM system is mission critical. Whether you are implementing a system for the first time or switching from an older system to a modern equivalent, doing so is a significant change management project. If you are to minimise the negative impact of this program and reap the efficiency and productivity improvements (and see return on investment) as swiftly as possible, then getting that change management process right is very simply a must.

There will of course be different dynamics at play within every organisation, so a comprehensive and detailed plan, put together in a methodical and structured manner is imperative. However, there are certain factors that remain true in almost every change management scenario. Equally, there are widely adopted best practices that can be applied.

Also included in the white paper is a look some key considerations that sit at the heart of good change management:

Understand the task ahead

Change is hard, and without proper understanding of your goals and the challenges you face, successfully managing it can be at best a complicated and drawn out process and at worst an abject failure.

In fact, according to change management guru John Kotter, 70% of change management efforts fail and this is largely due to a lack of preparation, a lack of understanding of best practices or more often than not a combination of both. However, at the heart of every successful change management exercise there is one maxim that holds absolutely true. Change Management is always about people.

Engaging the Head and the Heart

For a change management program to be successful it is absolutely vital we acknowledge that change is about individuals, not organisations. Yes, change will be driven by organisational needs and requirements, but individuals will implement it – individuals will determine its success.

Given this notion, we must next consider how individuals will react to change. Successful change management is as much about feeling as it is about thinking. This is one of the key principals in the Kotter Change Management philosophy and is one that is widely accepted to be an important step on the change management journey.

Principals of Influence

Robert Cialdini’s six principals of influence are certainly also worth considering when planning your change management program and the white paper looks at each of these and how they relate to change management within a field service context. The Six Principals include:

  • Reciprocity
  • Commitment and consistency
  • Social Proof
  • Liking
  • Authority
  • Scarcity

The importance of the change agent:

The white paper explores what a ‘Change Agent’ is and why they are key to successful change management, is another important piece of the puzzle.

Gartner’s Elise Olding neatly sums up this approach stating, “Change resistance is a myth. Employees support enterprise goals when they understand what needs to be done. Change Agents put a face on change and leverage trusted informal leaders to create understanding among employees and influence organisational change”

Breaking down the barriers of resistance:

The goal of a successful change management program should not be to completely eradicate resistance to change – this is an impossible task that will take too much energy. Instead, focus on reducing the impact of resistance, and overcoming it as quickly as possible to move the change management project from concept to full adoption as swiftly as possible.

The true key to successful change management is minimising the impact of resistance in your workforce – and to achieve this we must understand the types of resistance we are likely to encounter.

Generally, these will come in three broad categories which hare explained within the white paper:

  • I don’t get it
  • I don’t trust you
  • I don’t like it

Progressing through the adoption cycle:

Finally, the white paper explains why it is important to have an understanding of the various stages of adoption. In almost any organisation there are generally four groups of adopters that can be plotted on a standard Bell Curve.

Broadly speaking they should be categorised as follows:

  • Early Adopters
  • The Majority
  • Laggards
  • Naysayers

Want to know more? Access to this resource is available to Field Service News subscribers only – but if you are a Field Service Professional you may qualify for a complimentary industry practitioner subscription!

Field Service Professional? Click here to apply for a complimentary industry subscription to Field Service News and get the resource “Your Guide to Flawless Field Service – Perfecting Productivity” sent directly to your inbox now

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